Product Ingredients

What is safflower oil and how does it benefit your skin?

Posted on : 17.10.2017

The short answer

Safflower oil, when used on the skin, is an emollient—a type of moisturiser that softens and lubricates the skin. Emollients are oils that form a thin layer on the skin and help reduce moisture loss. But safflower oil is more than your typical, garden-variety emollient. It works with your skin in a unique way that helps ensure your skin’s barrier is functioning at its best.

What is safflower oil?

Safflower oil, as you may have guessed, comes from safflower seeds. The seeds are cold pressed to extract the oil which is then refined.[1] The key component that gives safflower oil its skin friendly properties is linoleic acid—an essential fatty acid and part of the omega-6 family. Safflower oil contains around 70-80% linoleic acid, along with various other fatty acids.[1] So when we’re talking about the benefits of safflower oil, we’re really talking about the benefits of linoleic acid.

Your skin barrier: A delicate mosaic

To say linoleic acid is an important component of the skin’s protective barrier, while true, is too simplistic. In order to understand the role of linoleic acid, we need to first understand a bit about the structure of the skin. At the cellular level, the skin is often described by a bricks and mortar model, where the bricks are cells, and the mortar is the fluid that fills the spaces between them. That’s all well and good, but since we’re talking about the outermost layer, the stratum corneum, let’s elevate this analogy up to roof level.

Imagine the tiles on your roof are the components of the skin barrier, (ceramides, cholesterol, free fatty acids, phospholipids; all that good stuff). When the tiles slot together neatly, without any gaps, you’ve got a properly functioning, leak-free barrier. If there are gaps or missing tiles, the roof will leak, and you’ll end up with dry skin. Of course, using all the same shape and size tiles works best on roofs, but that would be too easy. Your skin likes a challenge, so it constructs your skin barrier out of a variety of different sized and shaped tiles that all fit neatly together, much like the pattern of a Moroccan mosaic.

The problem with this approach to tiling is that if one of the tiles runs out, the pattern breaks down, and you end up with gaps. Take eczema, for example. People with eczema typically lose water much faster through the skin barrier, resulting in dry skin that’s prone to irritation. This is caused by low ceramide levels in the skin.[2] That’s like having a permanent shortage of red tiles (in the image above)—you’ve still got most of the design intact, but nothing can quite replace that red tile.

So getting back to safflower oil and linoleic acid. Linoleic acid is used to make ceramide 1 linoleate, one of the main tiles in the mosaic (let’s say that’s the green hexagonal tile). Studies have shown that levels of linoleate in the skin drop significantly during the winter, as well as later in life.[3] It seems the guy responsible for manufacturing green tiles has a stock shortage every winter, which is why so many of us experience dry skin as a result. The good news is that moisturisers containing linoleic acid (e.g. safflower oil) are able to help replenish levels of ceramide 1 linoleate, and help restore skin barrier function by replacing those missing tiles.[4]

The skin barrier is a complex mixture of components, each playing a specific role in the intricate and elegant mosaic that is your body’s first line of defence. Safflower oil is a great source of linoleic acid, a key component in that barrier, that works in synergy with the skin to help lubricate skin and minimise moisture loss and dryness.

A few products we love that contain safflower oil:

QV Face Purifying Mask – A luxurious clay-based face mask. With a gentle kaolin based formula, it removes dirt and excess oil, leaving skin smooth and soft to touch.

QV Face Nurturing Night Cream – A moisturiser formulated to replenish your skin while you sleep. The pH balanced, low-irritant formulation provides a protective barrier for your skin to help reduce moisture loss.

QV Face Revitalising Eye Cream – With a silky smooth, lightweight formulation, this eye cream helps to improve microcirculation around your eyes and helps reduce further moisture loss during the night.

 

  1. Rowe RC, Sheskey PJ, Quinn ME, editors. Safflower Oil. In: Handbook of Pharmaceutical Excipients. London: Pharmaceutical Press; 2009. page 610–2.
  2. Di Nardo A, Wertz P, Giannetti A, Seidenari S. Ceramide and cholesterol composition of the skin of patients with atopic dermatitis. Acta Derm Venereol 1998;78(1):27–30.
  3. Rogers J, Harding C, Mayo A, Banks J, Rawlings A. Stratum corneum lipids: the effect of ageing and the seasons. Arch Dermatol Res 1996;288(12):765–70.
  4. Conti A, Rogers J, Verdejo P, Harding CR, Rawlings AV. Seasonal influences on stratum corneum ceramide 1 fatty acids and the influence of topical essential fatty acids. Int J Cosmet Sci 1996;18(1):1–12.

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Helen Wright asked

I have recently had an actinic keratosis removed and am now desperately want to get my skin protection right…any advice please?

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